Image Alt

Blogs

As commercial uses for drones has grown, including those for agriculture, anticipation for new rules from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) governing the use of drones has also increased. This week the FAA released proposed rules that, once implemented, will allow businesses to use drones for commercial purposes. FAA Administrator, Michael Huerta, said, "We have tried to be flexible in writing these rules. We want to maintain today’s outstanding level of aviation safety without placing an undue regulatory burden on an emerging industry." Commercial uses are likely to include Real Estate photography and videography, inspection of powerlines and pipelines, rescue operations, wildlife monitoring, and farming.  Drones may serve many uses for agriculture

Putting aside the many political controversies surrounding gun rights and the right to carry firearms, there are many practical as well as recreational purposes for having firearms on a farm. There are, however, a number of ways a person may lose their right to possess firearms, as well as ammunition, regardless of the type of gun or the purpose for which it is used. These reasons may include felony convictions, the placement of a restraining or no contact order, and, in some cases, a history of substance abuse. Below are steps that may be of assistance in restoring rights to possess firearms. This can be a complicated and long process. The information provided here is for informational purposes only and not a replacement for consultation with a licensed attorney.

The Iowa Legislature recently enacted the Iowa Uniform Power of Attorney Act (IUPAA). The Act became effective law on July 1, 2014 and codified in the Iowa Code under Section 633B. The IUPAA greatly expands the state law governing the use of powers of attorney. A primary purpose for the enactment is to prevent abuse by individuals exercising authority under a power of attorney and to help ensure finances and estate plans are not misused or altered to benefit the recipient of a power of attorney.

Landowner liability for on-farm visitors and Iowa's recreational use statute received a great deal of attention in 2013. In the Sallee v. Stewart opinion the Iowa Supreme Court addressed several distinct issues in Iowa's recreational use statute, which limited the reach of the protections offered by the statute. This raised significant concerns from landowners, insurers, and others.  The Iowa Legislature quickly reformed the statute, attempting to expand protection and clarify what activities are included as "recreational." (Iowa Code Section 461C (2014)). The discussion below is intended to provide some guidance on the current state of Iowa's Recreational Use Statute - discussing issues that have been clarified by the recent ruling and corresponding legislation as well as raising issues that remain ambiguous.

As most landowners and farmers are aware, Iowa's farm lease termination statute, Iowa Code Section 562.5, requires written notice of termination of a farm lease by September 1. For most of the statute's history it has only applied to leases involving more than 40 acres. In 2013 the Iowa legislature amended the law, making it applicable to nearly all farm leases, regardless of size. This amendment has received little press and many landowners and tenants may not be aware of this important change.